FEATURED

In the News

Gillibrand secures $700K in federal funding for Dryden Rail Trail Bridge project

Ithaca Voice – May 6, 2022

When completed, the trail will connect three of Cornell Botanic Gardens natural areas across 16 miles and provide a safe, sustainable commuter route.

Video

Winter melts into Spring

The transitions between seasons are among the most magical at Cornell Botanic Gardens.

In Bloom Now

Early Spring Blooms

Here's what's blooming now in our gardens and natural areas.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Sustaining Historical Landscapes and Their Relevance in the 21st Century at Brian C. Nevin Welcome Center

When it comes to garden design and maintenance, every site presents unique challenges. Join us for a special in-person lecture as Carol Long, Curator of the Garden at...

Learn More

Cultivating Habitats at Home: Sowing Native Seeds at Brian C. Nevin Welcome Center

Join us for an in-person workshop to learn how planting native wildflowers and grasses builds habitat, promotes pollinators, and knits your home garden into the larger...

Learn More

Mindful Botany Walk at Cornell Botanic Gardens

Join Cornell Botanic Gardens staff to observe the beauty and drama of nature unfolding on monthly nature walks. While exploring various paths and gardens each month, we will...

Learn More

CONNECTING PLANTS AND PEOPLES FOR A WORLD OF DIVERSITY, BEAUTY, AND HOPE.

learn more

Land Acknowledgement

Cornell University is located on the traditional homelands of the Gayogo̱hó꞉nǫ' (the Cayuga Nation), members of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy.

Statement on Racism, Violence, and Hope

Our only hope for resilience, and path to meet our need to adapt, grow, and flourish lies in the diversity of people, plants, and all living creatures.

Statement on Anti-Asian Violence

Along with the campus community, we denounce acts of racism, violence and hatred, and stand firmly with our Asian and Asian American friends and colleagues.

Our Gardens and Natural Areas

We are responsible for the natural beauty of the Cornell University campus including cultivated gardens, an arboretum, and natural areas. Together these comprise one-third of campus, and with off-campus natural areas, a total of 3,600 acres.

BROWSE THE MAP explore

WHAT TO SEE IN SPRING!

Spring in upstate NY starts with the the bright blooms of witch hazels, early spring flower bulbs and continues with our native wildflowers.

Seasonal Highlights